Tagged "open science"

Method-Toolbox

Multigroup measurement invariance testing (in R und Mplus) Measurement invariance (MI) is a key concept in psychological assessment and a fundamental prerequisite for meaningful comparisons across groups. In the prevalent approach, multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA), specific measurement parameters are constrained to equality across groups, to test for (a) configural MI, (b) metric MI, (c) scalar MI, and (d) strict MI. In the online supplement to Schroeders & Gnambs (2018), we provide example syntax for all steps of MI in lavaan and Mplus for different ways of scaling latent variables: Identification by (a) marker variable, (b) reference group, and (c) effects coding.

Tests-Questionnaires

120 item gc test This is a 120 item measure of crystallized intelligence (gc), more precisely, declarative knowledge. Based on previous findings concerning the dimensionality of gc (Steger et al., 2019), we sampled items from four broad knowledge areas - humanities, life sciences, natural sciences, and social sciences. Each knowledge area contained three domains with ten items each, resulting in a total of 120 items. Items were selected to have a wide range of difficulty and to broadly and deeply cover the content domain.

The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale - A drosophila melanogaster of psychological assessment

I had the great chance to co-author two recent publications of Timo Gnambs, both dealing with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965). As a reminder, the RSES is a popular ten item self-report instrument measuring a respondent’s global self-worth and self-respect. But basically both papers are not about the RSES per se, rather they are applications of two recently introduced powerful and flexible extensions of the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Framework: Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling (MASEM) and Local Weighted Structural Equation Modeling (LSEM), which will be described in more detail later on.

Commitment to Research Transparency and Open Science

I signed the Commitment to Research Transparency and Open Science, which was initially worded by Felix Schönbrodt, Markus Maier, Moritz Heene, and Michael Zehetleitner from the LMU Munich. The first paragraph of this commitment summarizes the overall aim: We embrace the values of openness and transparency in science. We believe that such research practices increase the informational value and impact of our research, as the data can be reanalyzed and synthesized in future studies.

Meta-heuristics in short scale construction

Reference. Schroeders, U., Wilhelm, O., & Olaru, G. (2016). Meta-heuristics in short scale construction: Ant Colony Optimization and Genetic Algorithm. PLOS ONE, 11, e0167110. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0167110 Abstract. The advent of large-scale assessment, but also the more frequent use of longitudinal and multivariate approaches to measurement in psychological, educational, and sociological research, caused an increased demand for psychometrically sound short scales. Shortening scales economizes on valuable administration time, but might result in inadequate measures because reducing an item set could: a) change the internal structure of the measure, b) result in poorer reliability and measurement precision, c) deliver measures that cannot effectively discriminate between persons on the intended ability spectrum, and d) reduce test-criterion relations.